School is OUT!

Kindergarten in our house ended much like it started–quietly and with little fanfare. There were no end of the year parties, no tiny processional of gowned children. And this was okay with us–JC is not the party type.

Instead, I mentioned to him that he had completed his first year of homeschool and that after the summer, he’d be starting first grade.

“No,” he said. “I don’t think so.”

A year ago, a comment like that would have thrown me off-kilter. Not this time.

“Well, everyone has some type of school. So what should we call it?”

“Super awesome dinosaur battle time.”

Alright, then.

Just because we’re not the last-day-of-school-party type doesn’t mean I’m not taking some time to reflect on out first year of homeschooling. I’m working on a yearbook for him, noting not only his academic achievements but his emotional and developmental ones, too.

I feel like this year went…differently than I thought it was going to be. I made a lot of tweaks and changes as we went. The phrase “unschooling” has always turned me off–but I have a suspicious feeling that we leaned a little to that side in the end. Some things that I thought went well:

  • JC continues to stay at the level of or excel the public school standards. I was concerned about his writing and word recognition/spelling earlier this year, but the moment I stopped pressuring him was the moment he started doing it. His strong subjects are still science and math.

  

  • He is finally warming up to hanging out with other kids. I think he still prefers the company of adults, but he’s learning there are perks to finding a crowd his size who like superheroes as much as he does.

  

  • We have found a co-op we really like and we’re looking forward to their summer sessions and joining them again in the fall.
  • Project based learning really works for JC. I love watching him getting excited about learning–especially when he doesn’t realize he’s learning. Favorite topics this year were the solar system, trains (of course), dinosaurs and World War One.

 

soldiers vs. jedi in an epic battle

 
It is a little bittersweet to see kindergarten come to a close. We had a lot of ups and downs as a family during the school year, and I’m excited to sink into summer. While there’s always things to work on, my singular goal for this summer is to have fun and play–because after all, that’s the way we all learn best.

How Do You Vacation From Homeschool?

It’s Christmas week! It’s Christmas week! All over our town, school-aged kiddos slept in, got up and DID NOT put on their uniforms, and headed to the mall/museum/zoo to enjoy the first day of holiday break.

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I remember so well how special Christmas vacation was when I was little. It made the holidays feel real. It was my chance to watch bad day time TV and read FOR AS LONG AS I WANTED. My friends and I would go to the mall in the middle of the day, which felt decadent and a little bit naughty. You know the feeling, right?

So while this was going on all around us this morning, JC and I got up as usual. We had our morning routine (because holiday or no holiday, if you mess with my kid’s morning or night routine, our entire day falls apart). And then we…had a regular day. We read for as long as we wanted. He worked on his “novel” about Hoth, the ice planet from Star Wars (AKA he dictated to me and I typed as fast as I could). Nana came over and we went to the mall to finish up our shopping. We had lunch at our favorite Mexican restaurant. He’s currently drawing one AT-AT Walker after another in his “animation” notebook. It is essentially just another day for us. It was a fun, happy day, but it leaves me questioning: how do you have a vacation from project based homeschooling?

For the most part, we don’t follow a strict schedule. There are certainly parts our day that are more “school” than others, but the majority of the time we’re pretty free flowing. So how do I make “school breaks” special? Should I even have school breaks? I mean, for a 5-year-old, he has it pretty easy. And I’m certainly not going to stop him from working on something I would consider a homeschool project (even if it’s just considered “play” to him) while we’re technically on a break. But I find myself longing a little bit for that excited feeling of freedom, for both he and I. I don’t work a 9 to 5 job, so there’s no time off or Christmas party or holiday bonus. And he doesn’t school traditionally, so there’s nothing to break from.

This is one of these moments when I have to step back and think about the situation, long and hard. Why was it that I felt such freedom and happiness during Christmas break? It was the mental freedom from having to think and the physical freedom from being in school all day. When I look at it like that, I’m glad that JC doesn’t notice when we have a homeschool break. When I let go of something I have been conditioned to think (“school is out! I don’t have to learn anything!”) I realize that for my  kid, and my situation, I’m doing it right.

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I’m sure there will come a time when homeschool isn’t as fun as it is now. And we’ll take that break, and we’ll savor it. But for now, back to creating.