Harry Potter and the Book That Better Not Ruin It All: Trusting in the Writer

It’s the eve of Harry Potter’s birthday, but the big gift is for us. Tonight at midnight, we’ll be able to get our hands on Harry Potter and the Cursed Child–the script that is essentially the eighth book in the series. For those of you out there who are like me, and quite literally grew up with Harry, this is a very big deal.


I read the first book in high school before anyone knew who Harry was. I still remember when I realized JK Rowling was a female writer, and it was an extremely empowering moment for a young girl who aspired to be a writer herself.

I read the last book as a married woman. By then, everyone knew who Harry was. I stayed up all night and read the book in one sitting, both wanting desperately to know how it ended and not wanting to say goodbye.


I take the Harry Potter series very seriously. I wrote my college senior thesis on Harry as an archetypal hero. I truly believe that the series brought back the golden age of reading.

So it may surprise you to know that I’m not sure I want to read the eighth book.

Rowling gave us a glimpse into the futures of Harry, Ron and Hermione in the epilogue of the final book. And when I closed the book, I was satisfied.

All was well.


I’m not sure that I need to know what life is like for Harry nineteen years later. We live in a world of sequels, trilogies, series…but I believe that sometimes saying the end is the best and strongest decision for a story.
I feel similarly about the upcoming movie Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them, which brings us back to the wizarding world–this time in America–long before Harry was born. Leading up to the movie, Rowling has shared information with us about the American version of Hogwarts. I just can’t get excited about it. I think the names sound a little ridiculous, the concepts too strained. It’s like Rowling is trying just a little too hard.

Why is she trying? My husband would say that it all comes down to money, but I disagree with him. I think that sometimes, when you’re a writer, it can be hard to let go. You live the characters, you breathe them and dream about them. And even though the best choice would be to let the story rest, you just can’t. I imagine that as she penned Harry Potter and the Cursed Child, it was a bit like visiting very old, very good friends.


And that is why, ultimately, I will read the eighth book. I’ll take my time with it, not like my marathon nights of reading for books past, and I will trust in the writer. Because I owe it to the little red-haired girl who so looked up to the red-haired Rowling, and I’ll trust her to bring me home to Hogwarts.

Will you be picking up your copy of Harry Potter and the Cursed Child at midnight? Do you enjoy stand alone novels, or do you have to know what happens next?

No matter what quiz I take, I always end up in Hufflepuff.


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Summer Reading

I was always the nerd who loved summer reading assignments in grade school–and I usually blew through them within the first couple of weeks of summer so I could get on to the “good” books. Because, lets face it, 1984 is just not a “good” book when you’re a teenage girl.

Long gone are the days of required reading, but I thought I’d give myself a summer reading list–and even toss in a couple of nonfiction books, since I almost always read fiction. Here’s my list.


 

Perfect by Rachel Joyce

All the Bright Places by Jennifer Niven

Mr. Penumbra’s 24-hour Bookstore by Robin Sloan

Eat Dirt by Josh Axe

First Comes Love by Emily Giffin (out in June)

The Girls in the Garden by Lisa Jewell

Harry Potter and the Cursed Child by JK Rowling (out in July)

Library of Souls by Ransom Riggs

Love Walked in and Belong to Me by Marisa De Los Santos

The Girl in the Photograph by Kate Riordan

The Girls by Emma Cline

The Nest by Cynthia D’Aprix Sweeney

The Book of Doing and Being by Barnet Bain

Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking by Susan Cain

 

What’s on your reading list this summer? Are you or your kiddo doing summer reading?

 

 

 

Perfect Things

I found this quote in a new book I’m reading (Love Walked In by Maria de los Santos–I’m only a chapter or so in, so the story hasn’t evolved too much yet–but her writing style is beautiful). It stuck with me and I chewed on it all day, so I thought I would share.

 It made me think of items and things I’d put on my perfect list. Some I came up with:

  • The beginning of spring when the weather is amazing but it is too early for bugs.
  • The opening bars of Billy Joel’s Piano Man.
  • Twilight. The time of day, not the stupid books.
  • The way babies move their little mouths when they’re asleep.
  • Using your favorite pen.
  • The first bite of ice cream.

What would be on your list of perfect things?

If Book Nerds Ran the World

I saw this meme the other day and loved it:

  
I saw it the same day of the announcement that Harry Potter and the Cursed Child will be released in print this summer. I was already thinking, hmm, what am I going to have to cancel so I can sit and devour the script in one sitting? And so the funny little meme hit close to home.

Happy Friday, friends!

If you ruled the world, what proclamations would you make?

January Book Round Up

My literary goals for 2016: read 100 books, and don’t waste time finishing books I don’t like (I’m really bad about this). In January I read seven books for pleasure. I started and stopped reading three books. Here are my mini reviews (and, as always, no spoilers).

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The Good Girl by Mary Kubica: This book was dark from beginning to end. Mia Dennett, daughter of a prominent judge, goes missing for 6 months–then is returned home with amnesia. If that’s not mystery enough, add on the questionable morals of her family, a weird case of Stockholm syndrome, and hints that the kidnapping may not be as black and white as it originally seemed to be and you’ve got yourself a pretty legit thriller with a  satisfyingly twisted ending.

The Last Midwife by Sandra Dallas: This was a pretty good piece of historical fiction, and it will definitely please the feminist readers out there. Gracy Brookens, the sole midwife of a mining town in Colorado in the late 1800s, is accused of murdering an infant. The town splits as the trial convenes, and things come out about the community–and Gracy’s own family–give this slow-to-start novel the startling end it needs.

Reconstructing Amelia by Kimberly McCreight: We know from the start that Amelia, a 15-year-old private school student, is dead from an apparent suicide. What we don’t know is why. Told from the perspective of Amelia’s mother as she researches her daughter’s life and Amelia herself as she lives out the days before her death, it becomes apparent that the truth is not always what it seems on the outside. This book made me really, really happy that I was mothering a five-year-old boy and not a teenage girl.

Shopaholic to the Rescue by Sophie Kinsella: Oh, how I wanted to love this book. The original handful of Shopaholic books were great. The last one, Shopaholic to the Stars, was tedious at best. But I read this one, it’s sequel, out of loyalty. However, the things that made Becky, the main character, endearing in the previous books were grating and annoying. It was way too “out there”. I skipped huge chunks of the last part just so I could get to the end and see how it finally wrapped up.

The Guest Room by Chris Bohjalain: Loved it. Read my full review here.

Thirteen Reasons Why by Jay Asher: This YA read was clever. When Clay, the main character, finds a box of cassette tapes on his porch after school, he realizes they’re a narrative from a girl he secretly crushed on for years–a girl who has recently committed suicide. Much like Reconstructing Amelia, this was an interesting but deeply sad story about the complicated web of teen suicide.

Remember Me This Way by Sabine Durrant: When Lizzie goes to put flowers on the crash site where her husband perished a year ago, she finds that someone has beat her there–and the flowers are signed by a woman she has never heard of. Her decision to find out leads her down a path that unwinds life as she thought she knew it. This book is also an excellent commentary on domestic violence and how easy it can be to miss (as an outsider) and escape (as a victim). This book was genuinely creepy, and had me looking over my shoulder more than once.

I just realized that most of the books I read this month were dark and a little depressing. I’m not as into thrillers as much as my January reading selection would lead you to believe–but I will say that most of these books were delicious to sink into and kept my attention until the last word.

What did you read in January?

 

I Have a Weakness for Books

I have a really bad habit I’m trying to break: I always finish a book I start…even if I think it’s miserable.

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My husband thinks I’m crazy. My answer was always that I was waiting for the book to get better…or for the twist at the end…or for something. Occasionally I was rewarded. Most of the time I was not.

Since I’m trying to live more intentionally this year, I’ve decided to stop finishing books I don’t like. I feel pretty dastardly about it too. There is just something…cruel about not finishing a book. I don’t know if I think this because I’m an writer and I want people to read all my words, or if I’m just crazy.  But honestly, life is too short for books that don’t speak to you.

In the same vein, I’m also a bit of a book hoarder. I buy books with covers I like at clearance sales. I take in stray books when friends are cleaning out their houses. And I may have been known to buy a used copy of one of my favorite books  even if I already have a copy at home. I just like books.

As you can imagine, I have books all over the house. My bookshelves have long been filled and now the books are creeping into piles in every room. A lot of these books I don’t LOVE. It was bad when it was just me…but now that I have a junior bibliophile in the house, it’s officially out of control.  And so I’m going to start purging, and creating a library of books I truly adore. So that when people walk in my house and look over my shelves, they’ll only see books that really matter to me.

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(Frankly, this is something I could do in every room in the house. But baby steps, right?)

Do you finish books you don’t love? Is there an area in your life that would benefit from a purge?

2015 Books in Review

  
At my best count, I read around 85 books this year. I did a bad job of keeping track of them, which is something I want to work on in  2016. The number jumps to well over 100 if you count the re-reads of the year, but I think 80 or so new books in one year is pretty good. Here is my year in review:

Best Book: The Lake House by Kate Morton. I waited a long time and this book was truly worth the wait.

Worst Book: Paper Towns by John Green. This book built…and built…and built…then fell flat on it’s face.

Best New Writer: JR Ingrisano, who published Captain Jolly’s Do Over. 

Best Mystery/Thriller: Luckiest Girl Alive by Jessica Knoll. Creepy and incredibly engaging.

Best Chick Lit: Shopaholic to the Stars by Sophie Kinsella. Her books are always an easy, fluffy read when you need a mental break.

Best Twist Ending: Off the Page by Samantha Van Leer and Jodi Picoult. This was a fun YA sequel that answers the question, “what happens to the characters when the book is closed?”

Biggest Book Disappointment: In the Unlikely Event by Judy Blume. You know how you feel on a cold January day? Like you’ll never be happy or warm again? This is how that book made me feel.

Book I’m Most Excited For in 2016: The Guest Room by Chris Bohjalian. It is one of my life goals to finagle an early copy of his next book.

I hope you read some really great books this year, and I hope that your 2016 is full of amazing words. Thanks for making my words some of the ones you read this year!